Voiceworks #116 – “Pluto”

$12.00

Voiceworks is an Australian literary journal, published quarterly, featuring and produced entirely by people under the age of twenty-five. For thirty years, we’ve provided young writers with space to develop, experiment and publish their work.

Issue #115 “Goth”:

Goth’s cover features a beautiful illustration of a Barghest by Reimena Yee, and strange and creepy creatures abound inside its pages as well. A boy spits out a mysterious bird in Charles Pidgeon’s short story ‘Hym’. Carly Stone faces off with a cockroach in their essay ‘A sentence is a power struggle’. A human runs with Tasmanian devils in ppdans’ comic ‘Dieman’. And swarms of talking spiders, moths, roaches and rats visit a giant feast in David Farran’s simultaneously lush and gross fiction ‘A Feast’.

Inside Goth you’ll also find lots of ghosts, witches and vampires, a discussion of whiteness and goth aesthetics, meditations on death and loss, poetry that blends text with ASCII art, and a passionate twelve-page essay on what exactly makes The Veronicas so good.

This issue is filled with beautiful art and illustrated by the very talented Shae San Sim. As usual the gorgeous design is all thanks to our designer Michael Sun.

Voiceworks is an Australian literary journal, published quarterly by Express Media, featuring and produced entirely by people under the age of twenty-five. For thirty years, we’ve provided young writers with space to develop, experiment and publish their work.

Voiceworks Issue #116, ‘Pluto’, brings you more of the best fiction, nonfiction, poetry, comics and visual art by young Australians.

Pluto is packed with brilliant and exciting work from young Australian writers and artists. In fiction, Ellen Perdriau describes the insidiousness of surveillance technology, and Courtney McClelland draws us into a surreal but visceral experience of the toll capitalism can take on the body and mind. In nonfiction, Lauren Ironmonger’s ‘The Body That Listens’ offers tender and exciting theories on noise and its potential for disruption in white Australia, while Jess Cockerill delves into heteronormativity and queer time in the part-theory part-fanfic essay ‘pretty guardians of a queer time and place’. Patrick Gunasekera’s poem ‘Hey there’s a lot of white people here, if anything happens can you back me up?’ highlights the exhausting presence of whiteness in the arts, and Jasmine Pickup’s comic ‘We Are Literally Dying for Melbourne’s Queerest Talents’ critiques the tokenisation of people of colour and queer people by trendy media outlets.

In this issue you’ll also find killer zucchinis, Meryl Streep’s ghost, dream interpretation, reflections on prayer and divinity, Afrofuturism, and dogs.